15-Year-Old Boy Discovers New Planet 1,000 Light-Years From Earth

By on June 11, 2015 12:45:54 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

RavenX

Join Date 10/2008
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Pretty good article on Huff Post today. This kid found a planet a 1000 light years away. Pretty cool.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/11/15-year-old-new-planet-tom-wagg-hot-jupiter_n_7559158.html?ir=Good+News&ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000023

 

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June 11, 2015 3:32:08 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

We can only hope he names it something only a 15 year old can come up with. 

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June 11, 2015 5:28:11 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Quoting EleventhStar,

We can only hope he names it something only a 15 year old can come up with. 


HA...the names I would have come up with back then. Probably a pretty bright kid who wants a respected career in the field some day though so I bet he names it something boring.

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June 11, 2015 5:48:08 PM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Baconator.

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June 11, 2015 6:26:46 PM from Stardock Forums Stardock Forums

People don't really give special names to things like exoplanets unless they are REALLY important for some reason.  Its great that he discovered this, but a random hot Jupiter is going to stay named WASP-142b (the article doesn't really know what its talking about here - it has been named as far as the IAU is concerned https://www.iau.org/public/themes/naming_exoplanets/ ).

The boy would have to petition the IAU to get the name changed to anything else, and I'm not aware of that ever working in recent times.

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June 11, 2015 7:39:53 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Quoting Krazikarl,

People don't really give special names to things like exoplanets unless they are REALLY important for some reason.  Its great that he discovered this, but a random hot Jupiter is going to stay named WASP-142b (the article doesn't really know what its talking about here - it has been named as far as the IAU is concerned https://www.iau.org/public/themes/naming_exoplanets/ ).

The boy would have to petition the IAU to get the name changed to anything else, and I'm not aware of that ever working in recent times.


Of course everything get's a number-letter designation. Even stars we don't have names for we have number-letter designations for. If I discovered something though I'd at least want to name it. Either after myself or my family for posterity, or, if I was a 15 me, probably something stupid or fun. When I was 15 I pretty much only thought about one thing though.

What, wait...why can't I name it Poontopia? How about Kickassopolis? No? You guys suck. Screw science, I'm going home.

LoL

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June 11, 2015 9:06:04 PM from Stardock Forums Stardock Forums

But that's the point.  There is no process for naming exoplanets beyond the number-letter process unless you simply petition the IAU to get a popular name.  I don't believe that any exoplanets have received non number letter names although I think that the IAU announced that some would in the near future.

Just because you discovered a planet as part of a giant survey doesn't mean that you get to name it (for one, the funding and observational work was from elsewhere).  The idea that being the first person to see something gives you the right to name it for all eternity is something of an antiquated old Europe thing.  Discoverers get some rights, but they don't get a monopoly on naming.

If you wrote a series of papers about the object and used an informal name, the name might stick.  Or it might not if it wasn't proper enough.  There can be some politics in naming stuff as well, and a lot of people wouldn't like that you used an informal name (see criticisms of Mike Brown for naming dwarf planets in the solar system and the stuff with naming Eris).

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June 12, 2015 1:28:45 AM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

OK. Baconator216. Happy now? Sheesh.

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June 12, 2015 4:17:01 AM from Elemental Forums Elemental Forums

XX_notelescoped_420_XX

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June 12, 2015 1:16:56 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Quoting Krazikarl,

But that's the point.  There is no process for naming exoplanets beyond the number-letter process unless you simply petition the IAU to get a popular name.  I don't believe that any exoplanets have received non number letter names although I think that the IAU announced that some would in the near future.

Just because you discovered a planet as part of a giant survey doesn't mean that you get to name it (for one, the funding and observational work was from elsewhere).  The idea that being the first person to see something gives you the right to name it for all eternity is something of an antiquated old Europe thing.  Discoverers get some rights, but they don't get a monopoly on naming.

If you wrote a series of papers about the object and used an informal name, the name might stick.  Or it might not if it wasn't proper enough.  There can be some politics in naming stuff as well, and a lot of people wouldn't like that you used an informal name (see criticisms of Mike Brown for naming dwarf planets in the solar system and the stuff with naming Eris).


Indeed, quite true. With as many stars as we can see from Earth we'd never be able to come up with meaningful names for all of them, a alphanumeric system is the only logical way to go. I do think some exceptions should be made though when it comes to discoveries like new exoplanets or comets or asteroids. The idea may be antiquated, but there was a certain fairness to it. As with new animal or insect species found today their discoverers still stick with a genus or species name, they also (sometimes) get to name the common name, which is separate from the genus-species, which to me is quite acceptable.

I heard part of the snafu over Eris but didn't really learn any details of it so I'll have to look into it as you suggest. It sounds interesting. Watching the smartest people on the planet argue of stupid issues is always a good laugh. If they're so smart, something that silly really should be a non-issue.

 

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June 12, 2015 1:33:30 PM from Stardock Forums Stardock Forums

Quoting RavenX,

I do think some exceptions should be made though when it comes to discoveries like new exoplanets or comets or asteroids. The idea may be antiquated, but there was a certain fairness to it.

Who gets credit for the discovery?  The person who funded the discovery, the person who made the observation, the person who reduced the data, the person who analyzed the data, or the person who oversaw the whole operation?  Historically, the credit has gone to the last category (usually the principal investigator).  But nowadays the credit is getting spread around more.  In any case, the point is that there is almost never a lone discoverer in modern science - its a chain process.  The same thing happened here, but they are just focusing on the kid for PR reasons (nothing wrong with that, but just pointing out that he didn't do the observations, probably didn't do most of the reduction, and wasn't the PI).

Quoting RavenX,

I heard part of the snafu over Eris but didn't really learn any details of it so I'll have to look into it as you suggest. It sounds interesting.

Eris wasn't the biggest deal, but Mike Brown caused some controversy with naming of some of the other dwarf planets (his team has discovered a lot of them).  It's mostly silly stuff, but there is actually a lot of politics in naming this stuff, and there was a feeling that he wasn't following the right procedure.

Its not so much about being smart or dumb, its just that if you get a few hundred people from all around the world, they are going to disagree a lot.  Scientists also argue a lot.  It is their nature.

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June 12, 2015 1:50:51 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Quoting Krazikarl,

Who gets credit for the discovery?  The person who funded the discovery, the person who made the observation, the person who reduced the data, the person who analyzed the data, or the person who oversaw the whole operation?  Historically, the credit has gone to the last category (usually the principal investigator).  But nowadays the credit is getting spread around more.  In any case, the point is that there is almost never a lone discoverer in modern science - its a chain process.  The same thing happened here, but they are just focusing on the kid for PR reasons (nothing wrong with that, but just pointing out that he didn't do the observations, probably didn't do most of the reduction, and wasn't the PI).

 

I equate situations like that to something like the "discovery" of America by Christopher Columbus. He had to beg the ships from the Queen and King of Spain, though he still gets public credit for the discovery. Of course you can't discover something people are already living on, and also of course today we have solid archeological proof that the Norse beat Columbus here by over a 100 years as far as European discoverers go, yet I bet we never fix our school books to reflect that last fact which we really should. Clearly today we know Columbus didn't discover America, but a elementary student who just learned in school that he did would say otherwise. The financial aspect of funding should of course get an acknowledgment, just as Queen Isabella gets the credit for giving Columbus his ships in the history books, but he gets the glory, which is even more absurd for naming since Amerigo Vespucci and his maps are where the name America is derived from.

I indeed see how it can be a complicated process though and you're quite right when pointing out this story was just used for PR hype (and probably to get more funding too).

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June 12, 2015 2:18:28 PM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Quoting Krazikarl,

Who gets credit for the discovery?

Maybe the creatures living on it? This whole "discovery" thing is nonsense. Who "discovered" America, or Africa? Seriously? The first sentient creature there, that's who. 

Also, Baconator, add numbers, Greek/Hebrew/Runes...in zillions of combinations...gonna be LOTSA Banconators...which is as it should be. Run out of combinations and permutations? Go to FlapJacks&Bacon...BackBacon&___ - you fill it in. 

Might just get the space program going again with names like those.

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June 12, 2015 2:35:03 PM from Elemental Forums Elemental Forums

N/A

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June 12, 2015 6:54:29 PM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Anyone not understanding why Baconator [1...∞) is a superior nomenclature system just ain't 'mercun.

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June 14, 2015 1:49:10 PM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Banamba_517517-9Uvah 

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June 15, 2015 12:26:40 AM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Quoting RavenX,

I equate situations like that to something like the "discovery" of America by Christopher Columbus. He had to beg the ships from the Queen and King of Spain, though he still gets public credit for the discovery. Of course you can't discover something people are already living on, and also of course today we have solid archeological proof that the Norse beat Columbus here by over a 100 years as far as European discoverers go, yet I bet we never fix our school books to reflect that last fact which we really should. Clearly today we know Columbus didn't discover America, but a elementary student who just learned in school that he did would say otherwise. The financial aspect of funding should of course get an acknowledgment, just as Queen Isabella gets the credit for giving Columbus his ships in the history books, but he gets the glory, which is even more absurd for naming since Amerigo Vespucci and his maps are where the name America is derived from.I indeed see how it can be a complicated process though and you're quite right when pointing out this story was just used for PR hype (and probably to get more funding too).

Chances are the first 'outsiders' were the Vikings....half a millennium before Columbus...

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June 15, 2015 1:24:27 AM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Quoting Jafo,

Chances are the first 'outsiders' were the Vikings....half a millennium before Columbus...

I think they did!

 

It`s cool the kid did this!!    to him!!

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June 15, 2015 6:57:24 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Quoting Jafo,

Chances are the first 'outsiders' were the Vikings....half a millennium before Columbus...


I Did say the Norse beat him here . Norse = Vikings. Also not chances, they were. Check it out:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L'Anse_aux_Meadows

They beat Columbus as the first Europeans here by a good while. Hell he should of asked them for directions

Note: I mentioned them being here first up in reply #11

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June 15, 2015 10:47:18 PM from JoeUser Forums JoeUser Forums

Quoting RavenX,

I Did say the Norse beat him here . Norse = Vikings. Also not chances, they were. Check it out:

Yes, but Newfoundland isn't 'the USA' as such...it's an island. 

But, like I said..."Chances are the first 'outsiders' were the Vikings....half a millennium before Columbus.."

The devil is in the detail....

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June 15, 2015 11:42:21 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Oh now you're just being Jafo, er, I mean being picky . North America is a continent, not just one country

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June 16, 2015 12:49:40 AM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

Quoting RavenX,

Oh now you're just being Jafo, er, I mean being picky . North America is a continent, not just one country

Not being picky at all... Newfoundland isn't on the mainland.

 

If you 'found' King Island in Bass Strait [where I was born] you might almost be in sight of Australia...but you missed one huge continent and found a 40 mile long island instead...

Incidentally....more ships 'found' King Island than any other stretch of coastline in Oz.... there's 140+ shipwrecks to prove it...

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June 16, 2015 8:14:52 AM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Time to bring up theories of various cultures using rafts/canoes to cross oceans using ocean currents in the stone age. 

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June 18, 2015 8:42:17 PM from Galactic Civilizations III Forums Galactic Civilizations III Forums

Have to say, at that age I would probably named it after a hot girl I was trying to impress. I should have named it after a mentor or (cliche) my mother, but nope. I would have hoped to score.  [e digicons]:')[/e]

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June 22, 2015 6:19:17 PM from Elemental Forums Elemental Forums

Quoting RavenX,


Quoting Jafo,

Chances are the first 'outsiders' were the Vikings....half a millennium before Columbus...



I Did say the Norse beat him here . Norse = Vikings. Also not chances, they were. Check it out:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L'Anse_aux_Meadows

They beat Columbus as the first Europeans here by a good while. Hell he should of asked them for directions

Note: I mentioned them being here first up in reply #11

 

while it is very, very, likely that the Norse visited North America long before Columbus arrived - the real issue is that as a result of Columbus's visits, European powers began taking great interest in the 'new world.'  This was unfortunate for the pre-Colombian peoples of the western hemisphere. 

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June 23, 2015 2:43:19 PM from WinCustomize Forums WinCustomize Forums

In 1995 the first exoplanet was discovered. Twenty years later more than a thousand have been found. By that logic Columbus should have discoverd a lot more. What's up with that?

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